OVERVIEW

AGENDA 

SPEAKERS 

REGISTRATION 

ACCOMMODATION 

 

All sessions  


Opening Keynote Session  
The Future of Health & Medicine:  Where Can Technology Take Us    
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 8:00 - 9:15 AM EDT
   


Daniel Kraft, MD
Executive Director, Exponential Medicine and Faculty Chair, Medicine Singularity University 

In his address to FORUM 2015 attendees, Dr. Kraft will explore the impact and potential of rapidly developing technologies as applied to health and medicine biomedical research and healthcare innovation.

 Breaking Down Benefit Silos: Integrating Drug & Disability Claims  

Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 9:30 - 10:30 AM EDT 


Loretta Kulchycki, Vice-President, Group Marketing, Great-West Life
Mike Sullivan, President & Co-Founder, Cubic Health Inc
For years, Canadian health benefit stakeholders have had to rely on American studies relating to the impact of plan sponsors’ investments in health benefits and optimal health. Results have not always been relevant as U.S. input variables and ROI metrics don’t compare to the Canadian marketplace. To understand what investments in drug benefits mean to a plan sponsor in a Canadian context, in 2014, Great-West Life, Sanofi Canada and Cubic Health collaborated on a Canadian research project to integrate transactional-level drug, short-term disability, and long-term disability data sets on 38,000 claimants over a 3-year period.
The goals were to break down benefit silos by integrating these data sets at a transactional-level to look beyond drug costs and focus on a more complete picture of the burden of illness across a number of chronic diseases, and start a conversation within the broader industry to further research the impact of optimal health management to Canadian plan sponsors.
This presentation will review the intent of the research, methodology, key findings, and possible next steps.
Learning Objectives
  1. Highlight why health benefits no longer need to be considered in silos, and how plans can start looking at their investments in health benefits in a more holistic manner by explaining how drug, short-term disability and long-term disability data sets can be integrated.
  2. Review how total Burden of Illness can be used to measure returns on investments made to treat chronic diseases.
  3. Review key findings from an analysis of drug and disability claims on nearly 40,000 Canadians over a 3 year period, and begin a broader conversation in the benefits industry with respect to further research that can be considered with respect to the impact of optimal health outcomes to plan sponsors.
This session is intended for plan sponsors, plan advisors, insurance carrier representatives in the group benefits area, health and wellness product and service vendors, pharmaceutical manufacturers, independent consultants working within health benefits space.
Gamification: It's In Our future!        
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 9:30 - 10:30 AM EDT  

Nadia Darwish
Vice-President, Market Development, Sun Life Financial 

Learn how a game inspired approach is helping plan members make saving at work easier, encourage thoughtful investing and ultimately helping members maximize the benefits of their workplace retirement and savings plans with a focus on their longer term income needs. Hear how plan sponsors quickly integrated this approach into their programs, the response from plan members including Gen Y and Boomers and how this has made a difference and added some fun along the way.

Join Nadia Darwish, Vice President, Market Development, Sun Life Financial, to learn more about how to incorporating gamification and social media into your programs can shift the conversation and plan member behaviour towards saving for a more secure financial future.
Learning Objectives 
  1. Educate and engage clients and internal stakeholders
  2. Understand unique challenges and opportunities for FS
  3. Design a program that drives behavior and plan member results
  4. Demonstrate value through robust metrics processes
 Innovative Alternative Investing – A Global Perspective       
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 9:30 - 10:30 AM EDT 


David C. Saunders
Founding Managing Director
K2 Advisors, K2/D&S Management Co, LLC
Stamford, Connecticut, United States

Plan sponsors around the globe are considering alternative investments as a way to address potential underfunding on the part of participants as they approach retirement. The market decline of 2008 caused plan sponsors to look for ways to offer more diversified investment options beyond the traditional equity and fixed income approach. This session will share insights into the role of alternative investments, how they can help dampen total portfolio volatility and improve a participant's potential retirement outcome.
Learning Objectives
  1. Understand how alternative investments can diversify participant portfolios
  2. Learn how liquid alternatives more effectively manage volatility
  3. Recognize how to position liquid alternatives in DB and DC portfolios
  4. Learn what plan sponsors around the globe are doing to improve participants retirement income
This session is intended for defined benefit and defined contribution plan sponsors, asset consultants, pension advisors, custodians and recordkeepers.

La fin de votre régime est proche ? Préparez votre portefeuille!       
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 9:30 - 10:30 AM EDT  

  

Emmanuel Matte
, B.Sc., CFA, FSA, FICA
Directeur général principal et tête dirigeante mondiale, Solutions de placement,
Gestion d’actifs Manuvie

Cette séance présentera quelques considérations, suggestions et cas pratique pour optimiser la gestion des risques d’investissement et la transition vers un achat de rentes"


Innovations In Benefit Plan Design 
   
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EDT


 
Peter Gove  
Innovation Leader - Health Management, Green Shield Canada

One can be easily discouraged when looking at the landscape of Canadian Health. Chronic Disease is on the rise and our healthcare system, as it operates today, is ill-suited to manage it. In the Benefits world, we have talked about employee wellness for decades now, with little if any evidence that our strategies are having an impact on incidence of disease and disability and the related health program costs. 
So, the health care system, and our industry’s contribution to it, needs transformation. With that as the premise, this session will argue that Advisors, Plan Sponsors and Benefits Carriers have, in fact, a unique opportunity to contribute to generating change. We have just been going about it all wrong. Together we manage large data sets, we possess the ability to communicate with millions of plan members, and we have the opportunity to create innovative programming informed by research and the lessons from our data. 
This session will point us towards international and local strategies that have proven to positively impact at risk populations – not the marathoners and tri-athletes - the health-challenged folks who drive the vast majority of costs in our benefits programs. In short, wellness is broken, but we can definitely fix it.
Learning Objectives 
  1. Understand the impact of behavior on the development of chronic disease
  2. Learn what works and what doesn’t work when trying to change behavior
  3. Understand some of the weaknesses of present plan design
  4. Become aware of international success stories that can inform program and benefit plan design 


Retirement Help Matters 
   
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EDT


Sally Bradley-Golding
Vice President, Strategic Alliances, Financial Engines

With the decline of traditional pension plans in the U.S., today’s American workers share the responsibility of saving for retirement with their employer, and are tasked with acting as their own investment advisor. However, research shows many are unequipped to do so – causing retirement readiness to become a serious societal concern in the U.S.
During this presentation, Sally Bradley-Golding, Vice President at Financial Engines, will discuss the recent rise of retirement help and plan design best practices as a solution to employer concerns over retirement program efficacy. Attendees will glean insights from America’s largest independent investment advisor by learning how—and for whom—professional retirement help is having an impact.


Searching For Yield: What Is Next? 
 
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EDT


Janet Rabovsky
Director, Investment Consulting Services, Towers Watson

Today’s low interest rate environment poses issues for savers and investors alike. In an effort to achieve a return greater than is being offered by government bonds, many are turning to fixed income credit strategies, dividend paying stocks and other income producing assets. These investments have different risk and return characteristics and are intended to fulfil different objectives than secure income. How does an investment, be it plan sponsor or individual member assess these strategies and determine which is / are most appropriate? What are the current and future expected returns for them?


Décaissement : il est temps d’agir   
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EDT 

Jean-Daniel Côté, Membre du partenariat, Mercer
Lucie Dutil, vice-présidente, Régimes de retraite et avantages sociaux, Finances de Bell Canada
Animé par: David Charbonneau, Premier Vice-président Épargne-retraite collective de Desjardins Assurances
Le décaissement est un sujet brûlant dans l’industrie des régimes de retraite depuis un certain temps. Les changements législatifs et l’établissement des limites entre les différents intervenants ne se feront pas du jour au lendemain. Nous pouvons attendre l’environnement parfait, ou encore, commencer à apporter des changements aujourd’hui. Cette discussion doit nous permettre de prendre du recul et de nous axer sur les besoins des participants. Comment pouvons-nous les aborder et agir dès maintenant? 


Promises And Pitfalls Of Precision Medicine – Making Sense Of The Science And Economic Evidence  
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT 




Dr. Ruslan Dorfman
Molecular geneticist & co-founder and CEO, GeneYouIn

In January, 2015, President Obama announced the “Precision Medicine Initiative”, which emphasizes the role of genetics and genomics in health management. The staggering cost of “precision” drugs concerns both patients and insurers. For example, Kalydeco costs about $300,000 per year. Sovaldi, a new 12-week course of treatment for Hepatitis C, costs $1000 per pill. For cancer treatment, genomic tests are now required to both determine the most effective treatment and mitigate the cost of care, which can exceed $100,000 per patient.
Pharmacogenetic testing can help insurance providers leverage genomic tools to reduce the cost of drug and disability benefit management for their clients. Chronic disease management, often poorly optimized, is one of the prime areas for improvement through implementation of evidence-based prescription practices.
This presentation will discuss the legal, regulatory, economic and societal issues associated with the implementation of Precision Medicine, as well as the potential pitfalls for insurance providers.

Learning objectives: 

  1. Learn about the relevance of genomics in treatment reimbursement and drug plan benefit management.
  2. Understand the health economic framework of Precision Medicine - the impact on the direct cost of medications vs the cost of disability management.
  3. Enhance understanding of the Genetic Non-Discrimination Act and protection of patients’ privacy.
  4. Evaluate “Precision Medicine” delivery models and the collaborative approach to patient management to reduce cost of care.
This session is intended for insurance benefit consultants and insurance providers. 

Decumulation: Time To Take Action   
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT 

Jean-Daniel Côté, Partner, Mercer
Lucie Dutil, Vice-president, Pension & Benefits, Finances of Bell Canada
Moderated by: David Charbonneau, Senior Vice-President, Group Retirement Savings, Desjardins Insurance  
Decumulation has been a hot topic in the pension industry over the last while.  Waiting for the government to make legislative changes and drawing the line between various stakeholder responsibilities will not happen overnight.   We can wait for the perfect environment, or we can start making changes today.  This discussion will take a step back and focus on what the plan member’s needs are.  How can we address them and act now? 

Demography Is Destiny? Global Demographic Trends, Macro Concerns and Asset Valuations   
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT  

 


Erik S. Weisman, Ph.D. 
Investment Officer and Portfolio manager, Fixed Income, MFS Investment Management

Canada and the United States, like other developed countries, face a changing demographic landscape with older and fewer workers and consumers.  These demographic trends have major implications for global macroeconomic variables and asset valuations in the world’s financial markets.   An aging population presents significant challenges such as unsustainable age dependency ratios and limited social safety nets alongside a global debt supercycle, all of which could depress economic growth and introduce deflationary forces. There are also reasons for optimism, however, including the pivotal role that Africa might play as the only region with expected replacement population growth, and the potential for automation, robotics and technology to improve productivity.
Learning objectives:     
  1. What does it mean for demographics to go from a tailwind to a potential headwind? How important has this tailwind been in the past and how important might the headwind be in the future?
  2. Are global demographic trends priced into the asset classes investors may be considering? If not, are there great opportunities in select countries and sectors for investors who do understand the implications of aging populations and can avoid the pitfalls?
  3. Is there a demographic tipping point at which the population of one country or region is falling so rapidly that it can no longer be viewed as a viable place for investment? Are other countries and regions gaining population at rates that make them more interesting?
  4. What are the major challenges facing markets and policymakers going forward? Can we find reasons for optimism that we may be able to offset the growth-depleting and disinflationary forces from aging?
This session is intended for pension plan sponsors.

Diversifier : l’unique moyen de récolter la prime de risque?        
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT   

   
Stéphane Detobel
, Directeur général, TOBAM, Amérique du nord   

L’histoire montre que les indices capi-pondérés sont, ex-ante et ex-post, fort éloignés de la frontière efficiente. Nombre d’investisseurs ont été déçus par la poche «actions» de leur portefeuille : une volatilité importante pour des rendements somme toute assez faibles et très éloignés de leurs attentes. La question pertinente est donc de savoir si les indices capi-pondérés et les stratégies proches de ceux-ci capturent réellement l’entièreté de la prime de risque ?
Lors de cette session nous essaierons d’apporter une réponse à cette question pressante et examinerons les caractéristiques et avantages de cette dernière.
Learning Objectives: 
  1. Comment mesurer la diversification de vos portefeuilles?
  2. Comment récolter l’entièreté de la prime de risque?
  3. Quels sont les avantages apportés par une diversification maximale?
  4. Indices capi pondérés efficients? Ou marches efficients?
Cette séance est prévu pour tout investisseur long terme.

Retiree Exchanges Are Coming To Canada, What Will Be The Impact?
Wednesday May 27, 2015 - 2:30 - 3:30 PM EDT    

     



Brian Lindenberg
Senior Partner, Mercer

Exchanges or marketplaces have gained considerable traction in the US market for both active employees and retirees.  It is anticipated that interest in private exchanges will increase exponentially over the next 5 years with upwards of 45% of the US market considering the merits of this new delivery channel for employee benefits.  Exchanges have quickly moved from a new idea to a mainstream option.  This session will explore what is happening south of the border and identify both the challenges and opportunities related to bringing this concept into the Canadian market.   More specifically, a number of organizations are looking at the opportunities to introduce retiree exchanges into Canada.  What might these exchanges look like and how might they impact the delivery of benefits to both existing and future retirees? 

Learning Objectives
  1. Understanding private exchanges or marketplaces.
  2. Understanding the challenges and opportunities for the Canadian marketplace
  3. Understanding the opportunities to provide retiree benefits in a different way (in Canada)
  4. What might the future look like for retiree exchanges in Canada?

This session is intended for anyone who might be interested in innovative solutions for the Canadian market.


How to Prudently Make, Execute and Monitor Employee Benefit Plan Investments—An Antidote for Costly Mistakes and Expensive Lawsuits

Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 2:30 - 3:30 PM EDT   

 
Rory Judd Albert, Partner, Proskauer Rose LLP, US
Anthony S. Cacace, Associate, Proskauer Rose LLP, US
This session will highlight how benefit plan fiduciaries, with the assistance of their lawyers, can create a better framework for making prudent investment decisions conforming to applicable fiduciary standards and pertinent judicial decisions, including (i) how best to devise an appropriate asset allocation for a plan’s investment portfolio; (ii) the importance of “risk mitigation” through diversification, asset non-correlation; (iii) careful investment manager/vehicle “due diligence” and a judicious selection process; (iv) advantages and disadvantages of so-called  “alternative” and other “private” investment vehicles;” (v) use of investment consultants and other “experts”; (vi) prudent monitoring of plan investments; and (vii) new developments in benefit plan disputes and litigation.  Presented by two lively, extroverted American lawyers, we are exceedingly hopeful that you will find the presentation, not merely informative, but dare we say interesting, interactive and entertaining!

De-Risking Strategy       
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 2:30 - 3:30 PM EDT   

  


Michael T. Boychuk, FCPA, FCA
President, Bimcor Inc.

The financial crisis provided defined benefit pension plan sponsors with a front row seat on understanding the risks associated with their plans.  Pension plan funding and techniques for de-risking moved from routine review to the top of the agenda for Boards of defined benefit sponsors.  This session deals with de-risking, techniques, issues and tools and a case study in how one plan sponsor set about to de-risk their plan.

Big Data: From Hype to Real Value
Wednesday May 27, 2015 - 8:00 - 9:15 AM EDT    

    


Matthew Kuckuk
Practice Leader, Business Intelligence, Big Data and Analytics, CGI

In this session Matthew Kuckuk of Canadian technology firm CGI will discuss the current state of the evolution of Big Data, with a special focus on what companies are doing to realize value from their data through analytics.  He’ll present examples from insurance as well as other industries: banking, government, energy, manufacturing and transportation, to show the wide range of insights organizations are getting from data, and how many of them apply in more than one industry. 

When A Patient Becomes A Consumer
Wednesday May 27, 2015 - 9:30 - 10:30 AM EDT    

     


Matt Miles

Vice President, Product & Marketing, Group Benefits & Retirement Solutions, Manulife Financial

Users of the Canadian health care system have not needed to behave like true consumers in the past, resulting in a health care value chain lacking transparency and an efficient flow of information. Forces are emerging in the market that will lead to more informed consumers making more informed choices. But is our industry really ready for these changes? What will be the implications of this shift? Who is best positioned to take advantage of the opportunities and challenges this will create? Join us as Matt Miles discusses what happens when a patient becomes a consumer.


Who’s Risk Is It Anyway? British and Canadian perspectives on how pension risk should be allocated  

Wednesday May 27, 2015 - 9:30 - 10:30 AM EDT 







Henry Tapper, Director First Actuarial, Pension PlayPen, Friends of Auto-Enrolment, UK
Simon Nelson, Consulting Actuary, Eckler Ltd.
Moderated by Jordan Fremont, Vice-Chair & Secretary, CPBI Board of Directors
Death and taxes may be guaranteed, but who guarantees retirement income? Are guarantees helpful when so much is uncertain and should the state, employers and insurers be facilitating or underwriting our later life financial security.
In this session, Henry Tapper speaks about the changes in the way Britain is addressing these issues and Simon Nelson will speak on Canada.

There are areas of common ground; "New Brunswick" has been quoted as a model for Britain’s “defined ambition” pensions. There are areas of experimentation, such as Britain's introduction of auto-enrolment into workplace pensions. And there areas which are likely to be controversial, such as Britain’s “Freedom and Choice” initiative which will see the number of people annuitizing fall dramatically.
The hour long debate will bring in the audience who Henry and Simon will fully involve.
Learning Objectives
  1. What are the trade-offs between a guaranteed pension and a pension delivered by best endeavours?
  2. Can we nudge people into better behaviours?
  3. How much choice do people need, want or can cope with?
  4. Can Canadians learn from Britain (and vice-versa) or are circumstances too different?

Worldwide Wellness: Global Perspectives That You Can Take Home 
Wednesday May 27, 2015 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EDT    

   

Mike Kennedy 

National Leader, Health strategies & Solutions, Aon Hewitt 

Workplace wellness trends in Canada and beyond – hear what employers are doing today, anticipating doing tomorrow and planning for in the future. Areas discussed will includethe role of analytics, use of incentives, personalized wellness, and moving from wellness to wellbeing

Europe's Pension Reality  
Wednesday May 27, 2015 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EDT   

  

Elsa Fornero

Professor of Economic, University of Turin, Former Minister of Labour and Welfare of Italy

All advanced countries have to adjust to a rapidly aging population, not just in terms of overall population stability but also in terms of income distribution. Apart from a concentration of income and wealth, older generations enjoy a concentration of pension entitlements, various kinds of privileges and political power. This leaves the young with limited horizons.
European countries have followed diverse welfare reform paths, however, these can all be reduced to a common pattern: everywhere pension promises have been not only downsized, but also redesigned. Retirement ages have been raised ... Retirement ratios have been reduced and there has been a shift in the indexation of benefits. The link between individual benefits and individual contributions has been strengthened; actuarial corrections have been introduced (through indexation of retirement ages and/or pension benefits to longevity). Access to early retirement; gender differences have been reduced; transparency has been improved; pre-funding, through participation in pension funds, has been encouraged; pension portability among EU countries has been enhanced. These developments can be seen both as progress towards greater strength, financial sustainability and adequacy of traditional European welfare states, and as a rebalancing of economic relationships between generations and genders Their effectiveness crucially depends on the ability of citizens to recognize and generally approve their necessity. Without basic understanding by citizens, reforms risk having little or no effect or even being reversed. Informed judgment about economic reforms requires information and numeracy as well as literacy. This is particularly true of pension reforms because of their profound impact on people’s life plans. The Italian pension reform is a case in point.

How Employers Got On the Hook for Employee Mental Health, and How to Make the Best of It 
Wednesday May 27, 2015 - 2:00 - 3:00 PM EDT  

 

Sean Slater 
Sean Slater, EVP Sales and Marketing, Homewood Health
The cost impact of mental illness and disability is skyrocketing for employers. It has never been as important as it is now to deal appropriately and proactively with this reality. This session touches on the critical components required to get it right for both plan sponsors and plan members… understanding the cultural impact of mental illness, and how to provide the right level of support in a sensitive manner; understanding the issue of mental health relative to complex privacy legislation that varies by jurisdiction; and understanding how to ensure that mental health has the appropriate level of importance in the design and communication of benefit plans.
Learning objectives:  
  1. How to identify points in the process where privacy is an issue, and how to deal with these challenges
  2. The importance of elevating mental health from a wellness issue to a risk management imperative
  3. How to prepare managers, leaders and plan sponsors to deal with these issues
  4. How to target your investment to provide the best level of support to your organization and your employees
This session is intended for plan sponsors, insurers, advisors, and consultants.
The Rise in the Responsible Investor
Wednesday May 27, 2015 - 2:00 - 3:00 PM EDT 



Amanda Young
Head of Responsible Investment, Standard Life Investments, UK
Since the issuing of shares by the first company in Holland in the early 1600s, companies have faced boycotts.  Until recently, these boycotts have had little or no effect.  With the rise in technology, a new generation of investors emerging and the access to information, companies are under greater scrutiny than ever before.  How they operate forms an integral part of their ability to deliver continued value to shareholders.  Understanding how environmental and social issues affects the long term operations of the companies in which we invest, is an important part of Standard Life Investment’s process.  The session will cover three aspects, the developments of the responsible investment industry in Europe, the approach to integrating ESG by a mainstream investment manager and a deeper look into the topic of carbon divestment and stranded assets.
Learning objectives: 
  1. Understanding of how responsible investment has developed in Europe
  2. Insight into the growth and future of responsible investment and some of the emerging trends
  3. Understanding of how a leading UK based global fund manager is operating in this space
  4. Greater clarity around a hot topic for responsible investment (stranded assets)

Demography Is Destiny? Global Demographic Trends, Macro Concerns and Asset Valuations    
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT   

  


Erik S. Weisman, Ph.D.  
Investment Officer and Portfolio manager, Fixed Income, MFS Investment Management

Canada and the United States, like other developed countries, face a changing demographic landscape with older and fewer workers and consumers.  These demographic trends have major implications for global macroeconomic variables and asset valuations in the world’s financial markets.   An aging population presents significant challenges such as unsustainable age dependency ratios and limited social safety nets alongside a global debt supercycle, all of which could depress economic growth and introduce deflationary forces. There are also reasons for optimism, however, including the pivotal role that Africa might play as the only region with expected replacement population growth, and the potential for automation, robotics and technology to improve productivity.
Learning objectives:       
  1. What does it mean for demographics to go from a tailwind to a potential headwind? How important has this tailwind been in the past and how important might the headwind be in the future?
  2. Are global demographic trends priced into the asset classes investors may be considering? If not, are there great opportunities in select countries and sectors for investors who do understand the implications of aging populations and can avoid the pitfalls?
  3. Is there a demographic tipping point at which the population of one country or region is falling so rapidly that it can no longer be viewed as a viable place for investment? Are other countries and regions gaining population at rates that make them more interesting?
  4. What are the major challenges facing markets and policymakers going forward? Can we find reasons for optimism that we may be able to offset the growth-depleting and disinflationary forces from aging?
This session is intended for pension plan sponsors.

Demography Is Destiny? Global Demographic Trends, Macro Concerns and Asset Valuations    
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT   

  


Erik S. Weisman, Ph.D.  
Investment Officer and Portfolio manager, Fixed Income, MFS Investment Management

Canada and the United States, like other developed countries, face a changing demographic landscape with older and fewer workers and consumers.  These demographic trends have major implications for global macroeconomic variables and asset valuations in the world’s financial markets.   An aging population presents significant challenges such as unsustainable age dependency ratios and limited social safety nets alongside a global debt supercycle, all of which could depress economic growth and introduce deflationary forces. There are also reasons for optimism, however, including the pivotal role that Africa might play as the only region with expected replacement population growth, and the potential for automation, robotics and technology to improve productivity.
Learning objectives:       
  1. What does it mean for demographics to go from a tailwind to a potential headwind? How important has this tailwind been in the past and how important might the headwind be in the future?
  2. Are global demographic trends priced into the asset classes investors may be considering? If not, are there great opportunities in select countries and sectors for investors who do understand the implications of aging populations and can avoid the pitfalls?
  3. Is there a demographic tipping point at which the population of one country or region is falling so rapidly that it can no longer be viewed as a viable place for investment? Are other countries and regions gaining population at rates that make them more interesting?
  4. What are the major challenges facing markets and policymakers going forward? Can we find reasons for optimism that we may be able to offset the growth-depleting and disinflationary forces from aging?
This session is intended for pension plan sponsors.

Demography Is Destiny? Global Demographic Trends, Macro Concerns and Asset Valuations    
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT   

  


Erik S. Weisman, Ph.D.  
Investment Officer and Portfolio manager, Fixed Income, MFS Investment Management

Canada and the United States, like other developed countries, face a changing demographic landscape with older and fewer workers and consumers.  These demographic trends have major implications for global macroeconomic variables and asset valuations in the world’s financial markets.   An aging population presents significant challenges such as unsustainable age dependency ratios and limited social safety nets alongside a global debt supercycle, all of which could depress economic growth and introduce deflationary forces. There are also reasons for optimism, however, including the pivotal role that Africa might play as the only region with expected replacement population growth, and the potential for automation, robotics and technology to improve productivity.
Learning objectives:       
  1. What does it mean for demographics to go from a tailwind to a potential headwind? How important has this tailwind been in the past and how important might the headwind be in the future?
  2. Are global demographic trends priced into the asset classes investors may be considering? If not, are there great opportunities in select countries and sectors for investors who do understand the implications of aging populations and can avoid the pitfalls?
  3. Is there a demographic tipping point at which the population of one country or region is falling so rapidly that it can no longer be viewed as a viable place for investment? Are other countries and regions gaining population at rates that make them more interesting?
  4. What are the major challenges facing markets and policymakers going forward? Can we find reasons for optimism that we may be able to offset the growth-depleting and disinflationary forces from aging?
This session is intended for pension plan sponsors.

Demography Is Destiny? Global Demographic Trends, Macro Concerns and Asset Valuations    
Tuesday May 26, 2015 - 1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT   

  


Erik S. Weisman, Ph.D.  
Investment Officer and Portfolio manager, Fixed Income, MFS Investment Management

Canada and the United States, like other developed countries, face a changing demographic landscape with older and fewer workers and consumers.  These demographic trends have major implications for global macroeconomic variables and asset valuations in the world’s financial markets.   An aging population presents significant challenges such as unsustainable age dependency ratios and limited social safety nets alongside a global debt supercycle, all of which could depress economic growth and introduce deflationary forces. There are also reasons for optimism, however, including the pivotal role that Africa might play as the only region with expected replacement population growth, and the potential for automation, robotics and technology to improve productivity.
Learning objectives:       
  1. What does it mean for demographics to go from a tailwind to a potential headwind? How important has this tailwind been in the past and how important might the headwind be in the future?
  2. Are global demographic trends priced into the asset classes investors may be considering? If not, are there great opportunities in select countries and sectors for investors who do understand the implications of aging populations and can avoid the pitfalls?
  3. Is there a demographic tipping point at which the population of one country or region is falling so rapidly that it can no longer be viewed as a viable place for investment? Are other countries and regions gaining population at rates that make them more interesting?
  4. What are the major challenges facing markets and policymakers going forward? Can we find reasons for optimism that we may be able to offset the growth-depleting and disinflationary forces from aging?
This session is intended for pension plan sponsors.
Thank you to the FORUM 2015 sponsors